2017

Autoignition characteristics of oxygenated gasolines

Autoignition characteristics of oxygenated gasolines

C. Lee, A. Ahmed, E. F. Nasir, J. Badra, G. Kalghatgi, S. M. Sarathy, H. Curran, A. Farooq

Combustion and Flame, volume 186, pp. 114-128, (2017)
C. Lee, A. Ahmed, E. F. Nasir, J. Badra, G. Kalghatgi, S. M. Sarathy, H. Curran, A. Farooq
Oxygenated gasoline, Ignition delay times, Ethanol, Shock tube, Rapid compression machine
2017



Gasoline anti-knock quality, defined by the research and motor octane numbers (RON and MON), is important for increasing spark ignition (SI) engine efficiency. Gasoline knock resistance can be increased using a number of blending components. For over two decades, ethanol has become a popular anti-knock blending agent with gasoline fuels due to its production from bio-derived resources. This work explores the oxidation behavior of two oxygenated certification gasoline fuels and the variation of fuel reactivity with molecular composition. Ignition delay times of Haltermann (RON = 91) and Coryton (RON = 97.5) gasolines have been measured in a high-pressure shock tube and in a rapid compression machine at three pressures of 10, 20 and 40 bar, at equivalence ratios of φ = 0.45, 0.9 and 1.8, and in the temperature range of 650–1250 K. The results indicate that the effects of fuel octane number and fuel composition on ignition characteristics are strongest in the intermediate temperature (negative temperature coefficient) region. To simulate the reactivity of these gasolines, three kinds of surrogates, consisting of three, four and eight components, are proposed and compared with the gasoline ignition delay times. It is shown that more complex surrogate mixtures are needed to emulate the reactivity of gasoline with higher octane sensitivity (S = RON–MON). Detailed kinetic analyses are performed to illustrate the dependence of gasoline ignition delay times on fuel composition and, in particular, on ethanol content.
DOI: 10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.07.034